Getting Ready

It will soon be time again for my art group’s annual retreat. So in preparation, Deb and I started the process for deconstructed screen printing. Deb will be writing a longer post about this over on the Felting and Fiber Studio in September so I won’t show you very many photos but this will give you a taste of what we did this morning.

We had seven screens to cover with dye and a bunch of different things to create texture in the screens. We worked outside since the process is kind of messy.

And here’s some of the screens drying. I am looking forward to how these screens will print. It is always a surprise with deconstructed screen printing as it has a mind of its own.

And while we were outside, I spotted these Columbine leaves turning colors. I love the color combination here. I can always find something inspirational in nature.

Hope you have a good weekend and thanks for stopping by.

 

More Color Magnet Fabric

I was in a bit of a hurry yesterday when I posted and obviously wrote a very poor explanation of Color Magnet. You can read more about it on Dharma Trading, they have a few videos too. The Color Magnet is this really gooey stuff that you can apply to undyed fabric through a silk screen, stencil or stamp. I used silk screens. The fish I posted about yesterday was screened on and then dry dye powder was added to the wet Color Magnet.

Color Magnet Leaves

All of these were screened on. The cotton fabric was then dyed with fiber reactive dyes and soda ash. So the leaves above were where the Color Magnet was screened on and let dry. Then I put the fabric in a baggie with green dye and the color magnet attracts more dye than the regular cotton so the leaves are a darker green than the background. Kind of neat.

Color Magnet Marbles

This was a screen that was originally a photo of marbles. It’s a little hard to see due to the lighter gold color.

Color Magnet Peeling Paint

This last piece of cotton was dyed with turquoise. It worked really well. This screen was a paper laminated screen that I made several years ago.

Color Magnet Wool

And of course I needed to try the product out on wool. The Color Magnet says that it works with all types of dye so I thought it would work the same with the acid dyes. I screen printed the Color Magnet on a piece of white commercial wool and let it dry. Then I put the wool in a “Cabernet” colored dye pot and let it simmer for 30 minutes. The lighter areas are where the Color Magnet was applied. So it worked more like a resist instead of attracting more dye. I think the areas that are mid value were where the Color Magnet was applied but not as thick. Needless to say, it didn’t work as advertised but I really like the results. The varying values give the piece a lot of depth.

So I hope that gives a little bit better explanation of using Color Magnet. It seems to work best on cotton fabric with fiber reactive dyes. Let me know if you give it a try!

Color Magnet Experiments

Last week, my local group got together and tried out Color Magnet. It is supposed to attract dye. I only got one piece dyed. This one was dry dye sprinkled on to wet Color Magnet after I had screened it on to cotton fabric. This would have worked better if I had soaked the fabric in soda ash first.

Color Magnet Fish

But it did work. I have some other pieces that are dyeing now so I’ll have to show you later. Have a good weekend.

Shop Open and Monoprinting with Thickened Dye

I finally got my shop open over at The Felting and Fiber Studio. I have two PDF tutorials and my book for sale. I hope you’ll check it out. I will be putting more PDF tutorials on the page as I finish them. When you get to the page, if you click on the Buy Now button, another page will pop up with further information about the tutorials.

Monoprinting with Thickened Dye

I am also working on my next online class. The third part of the series of Surface Design on Felt. This class will be about playing with thickened dye on felt including making and using a variety of stencils, creating your own stamps and stamping on felt as well as other printing techniques. So I was busy making some samples today and starting the writing process. It always takes me a while but I hope to have the course ready by fall. The photo above is a “ghost” print on paper after I printed on a piece of wool. Have a great weekend!

Ice Dyed Silk Gauze

When our surface design group met last week, we did some ice dyeing. I dyed 6 pieces of 5mm silk gauze that I am going to use in nuno felting. I did a quick tutorial on how to do ice dyeing several years ago on The Felting and Fiber Studio. Louise had us all set up outside to do the ice dyeing so we worked pretty quickly in the cold. I did one jar with more purple dyes and the other with reds and oranges.

Ice Dyeing

It’s simple to do, just layers of ice, fabric and dye powder. Then you let it melt and rinse it out.

Here are the 5 pieces that were white to start with and then ice dyed. It was interesting that several of these had bands of color on them as I just wadded the silk up and stuck it in.

Silk dyed by Ruth Lane

This piece was already dyed with eco printing to start. It was pretty sad to start and I was hoping to improve it but it didn’t take up much more color.

Silk dyed by Ruth Lane

Here’s is a close up of one of the scarves. They all have some very nice patterning and mix of colors. Now to get the right color merino to go with each one and start some nuno felting!